Crazy. Sane. Normal.


madman-and-still-not-ginger:

ursodum:

“I’m sorry. This is the first time I’ve hired a maid.”

The only woman on this movie whom I saw fit to raise a child, and she was the only one who couldn’t.

WOW THAT COMMENT WASN’T OKAY


Via idk


coolator:

Sydney Corcoran poses at the finish line one year after she was injured in the Boston Marathon bombing. More Here


Via Hello :D


zedface:

dulect:

wow they really did adapt frozen well

JESUS FUCKING CHRIST ON THE CROSS


Via Only if you eat me first...

DO NOT SUPPORT JELLY BELLY THIS EASTER

kecrambles:

waitingfordesire:

Jelly Belly Chairman donates $5000 to help turn back the rights of trans kids in California to use the bath room and change rooms of their gender identity, not assigned sex.
Source: THE AGE

man i fucken liked jelly belly too, why do the best jelly beans have to turn out this way
why

Via super duper lesbian


fartgallery:

chesterloaf:

fartgallery:

i donate blood in the hopes that my blood will overpower theirs and take control of their body so i will gain another vessel to use as my own

why am I reblogging this?

it appears my blood has been successful

Via Like a BOSS

jncera:

If your name is nancy and you get pregnant you will be pregnancy

Via ayy



(Source: pleasestopbeingsad)



merlinsassbutt:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

As Hazel says in one of my favorite quotes, “When surprised and exited and innocent Gus emerged from Grand Gesture Metaphorically Inclined Augustus, I literally could not resist”


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